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Join us as we keep the conversation going…

If you participated in our Community Justice Challenge, you are probably here because you recognize the importance of keeping the conversation going as it relates to eliminating racism.

If you didn’t participate in this year’s Community Justice Challenge, you are still welcome to join us. Learning about ways to advocate for racial equity and justice for all is a journey that we are all on together. Everyone is welcome to start their journey any time.

Beyond 21 is an initiative focused on keeping us together to have the important conversations following our 21-day Community Justice Challenge.

This year, we are launching a Beyond 21 Book Club

Introducing All the RaGE – YWCA South Florida’s First-Ever Racial Equity Book Club (a Program of YWCA South Florida’s Beyond 21 Series)

WHEN:
Once a month on the fourth Thursday from 2-3 p.m.

WHERE:
Virtually (Zoom link to be provided)

Grab your lunch and join us virtually each month to discuss the books we have pre-selected for us to read together. Commit to 10 pages each day. Tune in as we recap and discuss.

Register Now

Purchase with pride:

Consider supporting a minority-owned book store when purchasing your books. Here are two we recommend.

Books we are reading:

Featured Book for May

The Fire This Time – a collection of essays
By: Jesmyn Ward

In this bestselling, widely lauded collection, Jesmyn Ward gathers our most original thinkers and writers to speak on contemporary racism and race, including Carol Anderson, Jericho Brown, Edwidge Danticat, Kevin Young, Claudia Rankine, and Honoree Jeffers. “An absolutely indispensable anthology” (Booklist, starred review), The Fire This Time shines a light on the darkest corners of our history, wrestles with our current predicament, and imagines a better future.


Featured Book for June

The Color Of Law
By: Richard Rothstien

In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation–that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation–the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments–that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.


Featured Book for July

Caste: The Origin of our Discontent
By: Isabel Wilkerson

Caste took the nation by storm when it hit shelves in August 2020, mere months after the murder of George Floyd and during the height of protests in cities across the US. Isabel Wilkerson made history as the first black woman in the history of American journalism to win a Pulitzer Prize with her groundbreaking exploration of the unspoken caste system that defines our lives to this day in the US.


Featured Book for August

Caste: The Origin of our Discontent
By: Isabel Wilkerson

Caste took the nation by storm when it hit shelves in August 2020, mere months after the murder of George Floyd and during the height of protests in cities across the US. Isabel Wilkerson made history as the first black woman in the history of American journalism to win a Pulitzer Prize with her groundbreaking exploration of the unspoken caste system that defines our lives to this day in the US.


Featured Book for SEPTEMBER

Homegoing
By: Yaa Gyasi

The unforgettable New York Times best seller begins with the story of two half-sisters, separated by forces beyond their control: one sold into slavery, the other married to a British slaver. Written with tremendous sweep and power, Homegoing traces the generations of family who follow, as their destinies lead them through two continents and three hundred years of history, each life indelibly drawn, as the legacy of slavery is fully revealed in light of the present day. Effia and Esi are born into different villages in eighteenth-century Ghana.


Featured Book for OCTOBER

Under the Skin
By: Linda Villarosa

Under the Skin, Linda Villarosa lays bare the forces in the American health-care system and in American society that cause Black people to “live sicker and die quicker” compared to their white counterparts. Today’s medical texts and instruments still carry fallacious slavery-era assumptions that Black bodies are fundamentally different from white bodies. Study after study of medical settings show worse treatment and outcomes for Black patients. Black people live in dirtier, more polluted communities due to environmental racism and neglect from all levels of government. And, most powerfully, Villarosa describes the new understanding that coping with the daily scourge of racism ages Black people prematurely. Anchored by unforgettable human stories and offering incontrovertible proof, Under the Skin is dramatic, tragic, and necessary reading.


Featured Book for NOVEMBER

The Metanarrative of Blindness
By: David Bolt

The Metanarrative of Blindness counters this trend by bringing to readings of twentieth-century works in English a perspective appreciative of impairment and disability. Author David Bolt examines representations of blindness in more than forty literary works, including writing by Kipling, Joyce, Synge, Orwell, H. G. Wells, Susan Sontag, and Stephen King, shedding light on the deficiencies of these representations and sometimes revealing an uncomfortable resonance with the Anglo-American science of eugenics.